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ARTICLES

This is one of many art pieces by science artist Elinor Mossop that will be exhibited at the Lake George Arts Project gallery later in the summer. While sifting through the sediment from the sunken 1758 bateaux in Lake George trying to find live testate amoebae (tiny single cell organisms), Mossop found many tests (shells) that had once been inhabited. Studying the empty amoeba tests (shells) through a scanning electron microscope reminded Mossop of the wrecks as both look desolate. In this drawing the artist shrank a bateau wreck to the size of an amoeba test (shell) and placed the two types in one landscape (credit: Elinor Mossop).
Lake Art to Be Exhibited in Gallery, Internet, and Underwater
By Joseph W. Zarzynski & Bob Benway

(This article originally appeared in the June 12, 2009 issue of the LAKE GEORGE MIRROR newspaper, Lake George, New York, USA)

    This summer is the 250th anniversary of British Gen. Jeffery Amherst’s 1759 military campaign that forced the French from the north end of Lake George and the Champlain Valley. To commemorate the anniversary and promote art/science collaboration, the Lake George Arts Project will host an art exhibit that can be viewed in their gallery, on the Internet, and even underwater in Lake George.
    Entitled “Raising the Fleet—An Art/Science Initiative” the Aug. 25-Sept. 10 show will feature the work of Albany artist Elinor Mossop.
    The genesis for the exhibit began in 2008, when cell biologist Dr. Sam Bowser and science artist Elinor Mossop teamed with Bateaux Below. The partners conducted an art/science project centered around Lake George’s Sunken Fleet of 1758, an event when the British deliberately sank over 260 of their warships to put them into “cold storage” over the winter of 1758-1759. Many of the sunken bateaux were raised and used in the 1759 expedition.
    Last year, Bowser and Bateaux Below members made scuba dives at sunken bateaux collecting micro-size single cell organisms called testate amoebae from the lake sediment. Drawings of the Sunken Fleet of 1758, created by Bateaux Below and Mossop, were scanned, assembled into quilt design-type mosaics, and reduced to miniature scale. Bowser and Mossop then transformed the reduced mosaics into 3-dimensional images. Tiny testate amoebae were then released onto the 3-D surfaces. Bowser and Mossop employed a sophisticated electron microscope to inspect the single cell organisms crawling about the archaeological drawings. Mossop then interpreted the creatures exploring the 3-D images and produced a series of cutting edge illustrations. The project investigates the micro-creatures that inhabit the French & Indian War (1755-1763) bateaux found in Lake George and the art is an innovative way to inform the public about this scientific endeavor.
    State officials have given permission to have the art exhibited underwater, too. Custom-built easels, designed by Bateaux Below’s Bob Benway and fashioned by employees at Miller Mechanical Services in Glens Falls, will hold Mossop’s creations. Reproduced on waterproof paper, the art will be installed in the lake at “The Sunken Fleet of 1758” shipwreck preserve, an underwater park for divers. Thus, scuba enthusiasts can plunge into 40 ft. of water to view the art displayed on easels erected around a shipwreck. The underwater exhibit will be a first for the “Queen of American Lakes.”
    The Museum of Underwater Archaeology, an Internet-based museum that provides cyberspace viewing of special maritime projects, will likewise showcase the exhibit.
    The Lake George Arts Project gallery exhibit shall feature an informational video prepared by Pepe Productions and will also include a diorama assembled by Bateaux Below ship modeler John Farrell. The diorama portrays how the underwater exhibit at the shipwreck preserve is being set up.
    The gallery exhibit’s opening reception is Friday, Aug. 28, 5-8 p.m., and is open to the public.
    Finally, the Lake George Arts Project will sponsor a 3-hr. Aug. 29 workshop at the Wiawaka Holiday House. Entitled “Beyond the Bateaux—An Art/Science Initiative Workshop,” it will be taught by artist Chris Moran. The workshop examines “the nature of art/science collaboration through a visual arts experience.” The workshop is free, but space is limited. Pre-registration is required. For more information see (www.lakegeorgearts.org) or contact the Lake George Arts Project @ 518-668-2616.



NEWS RELEASES

For Immediate Release
February 4, 2009

"The Lost Radeau" Documentary Airing on Mountain Lake PBS Television

A locally-produced documentary about a Lake George shipwreck from the French & Indian War (1755-1763) will be shown this weekend on Mountain Lake PBS television station (Plattsburgh, NY).  Glens Falls-based Pepe Productions' documentary, "The Lost Radeau: North America's Oldest Intact Warship," will be shown on Sat., Feb. 7 at 9 pm.

The award-winning documentary was written by J.R. Whitesel and Joseph W. Zarzynski and it is the story of Lake George's LAND TORTOISE radeau shipwreck.  The British radeau, a type of floating gun battery, is one of only six shipwrecks in American waters designated as a National Historic Landmark.  The 52 ft. long warship was deliberately sunk by British forces on Oct. 22, 1758 to protect it over the winter from French raiders.  The radeau (French for raft) ended up in over 100 ft. of water and thus was never recovered in 1759.  The historic shipwreck was found in 1990 by the local underwater archaeology team Bateaux Below, Inc.=2 0and then was studied by that group.

Over the next three years, "The Lost Radeau" documentary will be shown multiple times on each of the nine PBS stations in the New York state.     

Pepe Productions' Peter Pepe and Bateaux Below's Joseph W. Zarzynski journeyed to Plattsburgh on Jan. 21 and were interviewed by Mountain Lake PBS station's Tom Hallock.  That interview, providing insight into the making of the documentary, will also air during the Feb. 7 showing of the special two hour program. 



For Immediate Release
January 13, 2009

Local Documentary Shown at Film Festival in Toronto, Canada
 
     A local award-winning documentary, “The Lost Radeau: North America’s Oldest Intact Warship,” was one of four documentary films shown at the January 10 “REEL Archaeology” film festival in Toronto, Canada.  The film festival was held at the historic Elgin Winter Garden Theatre and it was part of the Society for Historical Archaeology’s annual conference held January 7-11.  Over 800 historical and underwater archaeologists attended the international conference and the REEL Archaeology film festival was also open to the public.
    Pepe Productions, a Glens Falls-based video and multi-media company, produced “The Lost Radeau.”  T he 57 min. long documentary is the story of Lake George’s 1758 LAND TORTOISE radeau shipwreck, only one of six shipwrecks in American waters designated as a National Historic Landmark.  “The Lost Radeau” documentary (www.thelostradeau.com) was written by J. R. Whitesel (Queensbury) and Joseph W. Zarzynski (Wilton).
    On January 7, video filmmaker Peter J. Pepe (Glens Falls) and underwater archaeologist Joseph W. Zarzynski taught a day-long workshop at the SHA conference entitled “An Archaeologist’s Guide to Documentary Filmmaking.”



For Immediate Release
July 22, 2008

Lake George Shipwreck Documentary on PBS Television

    "The Lost Radeau: North America's Oldest Intact Warship" documentary by Glens Falls-based Pepe Productions will have its world television premiere on August 6 at 9 pm on Plattsburgh's Mountain Lake PBS television station.  The award-winning documentary will then be shown in the Lake George/Glens Falls/Saratoga/Albany region on Troy's WMHT PBS television station on August 14 at 9 pm.  The documentary will also be shown on all PBS stations around the state. 
    "The Lost Radeau" is the story of the 1758 LAND TORTOISE radeau, a British warship of the French & Indian War.  This year marks the 250th anniversary of the sinking of th e floating gun battery in Lake George, New York.  The LAND TORTOISE was deliberately sunk on October 22, 1758 to protect the seven-sided vessel from French raiders over the winter of 1758-1759.  The radeau did not end up in the lake's shallows.  Rather it unexpectedly sank into deep water and thus was not raised by the British in 1759.  The amazingly well-preserved shipwreck was found by Bateaux Below during a June 26, 1990 Klein side scan sonar survey.  From 1991-1993, the underwater archaeology team mapped the shipwreck that rests in 107 ft. of water.
    In 1998, the 52 ft. long LAND TORTOISE shipwreck was designated a National Historic Landmark, only the sixth shipwreck in American waters with that national recognition.  
    "The Lost Radeau" was directed by Peter Pepe and co-written by J.R. Whitesel and Joseph W. Zarzynski.     Today the LAND TORTOISE shipwreck is part of a unique state park for scuba divers called "Submerged Heritage Preserves."  Due largely to the depth of the Lake George shipwreck, only about 100-125 divers a year register with the NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation to dive the radeau.  Now television viewers can "Dive Into History" and visit this one-of-a-kind shipwreck through the "telepresence" of PBS television.
    "The Lost Radeau" documentary is also available for sale from Pepe Productions; for details visit www.thelostradeau.com.



For Immediate Release
February 22, 2008


Bookmark on Lake George Radeau Shipwreck Available

    Bateaux Below, Inc., a not-for-profit corporation that conducts underwater archaeological studies at Lake George, has released a 7.5 in. x 2.5 in. bookmark that is fashioned into the shape of the seven-sided 1758 LAND TORTOISE radeau shipwreck that lies in deepwater in the “Queen of American Lakes.” One side of the bookmark shows the sunken warship in plan view and the other side provides text with details of the French and Indian War vessel’s history and construction details.
    In 1990, during a Klein 595 side scan sonar survey, Bateaux Below discovered the 52 ft. long LAND TORTOISE shipwreck. This year marks the 250th anniversary of the sinking of the British warship. The bookmark is part of a public educational outreach campaign to inform people about the National Historic Landmark, only the sixth shipwreck in American waters with NHL designation from the U.S. Department of the Interior.
    Glens Falls-based Pepe Productions donated its expertise for the layout of the bookmark. The bookmark was financed from a legacy fund created from the sales of the award winning DVD documentary—“The Lost Radeau: North America’s Oldest Intact Warship.”
    Bateaux Below is donating the bookmarks to Lake George-area libraries and schools. The eye-catching bookmark is available to the public at no cost, courtesy of Bateaux Below, at the Caldwell-Lake George Library (telephone: 518-668-2528), located at 336 Canada Street in Lake George.



ARTICLES

Lake George: Birthplace of the “Modern” American Navy?
By Joseph W. Zarzynski & Bob Benway
There has long been a debate in maritime history as to where is the “Birthplace of the American Navy.” The genesis for this controversy dates to the American Revolution (1775-1783)...(read more)

New Documentary About Lake George Being Filmed
By Joseph W. Zarzynski & Bob Benway
Following the success of the award winning documentary, “The Lost Radeau: North America’s Oldest Intact Warship,” the team that created the production about Lake George’s 1758 LAND TORTOISE shipwreck is completing a new documentary film about Lake George. Local multi-media company, Pepe Productions, and not-for-profit corporation, Bateaux Below, are collaborating on a new DVD that has been a year-and-a-half in production...(read more)

Plans for the 250th Anniversary of “The Sunken Fleet of 1758”
By Joseph W. Zarzynski & Bob Benway
In the autumn of 1758, British and provincial troops at Lake George deliberately sank much of their squadron—260 bateaux, two radeaux, the sloop EARL OF HALIFAX, and some row galleys. Fort William Henry had been destroyed by the French in 1757, so there was no garrison to protect their vessels. The mass sinking, known as “The Sunken Fleet of 1758,” bought the British time to rebuild their army after...(read more)



NEWS RELEASES
 
For Immediate Release
November 5, 2007

Pepe Productions’ Peter Pepe Named “Honorary Member” of Bateaux Below

    On November 2, 2007, Pepe Productions’ Peter Pepe was awarded a plaque for being named an “Honorary Member” of Bateaux Below, Inc. The honorary membership was bestowed for Peter Pepe’s multi-media support of Bateaux Below’s numerous underwater archaeology and submerged cultural resources projects at Lake George, New York. The presentation was made by Bateaux Below’s Joseph W. Zarzynski, an underwater archaeologist and the Executive Director of the not-for-profit corporation.
    Peter Pepe, a resident of Glens Falls, New York, has for nearly three decades been a regional authority on video and other multi-media technology. Pepe Productions was one of the partners that collaborated on the 2005 DVD documentary—“The Lost Radeau: North America’s Oldest Intact Warship.” The other partners in that award-winning documentary were Bateaux Below, Black Laser Learning, and Whitesel Productions.
    The “Honorary Member” designation for Peter Pepe was by unanimous vote of the Board of Bateaux Below at the organization’s annual meeting on September 22, 2007. Peter Pepe is the only non-diver to have ever received this honor. Over the past 20 years there have been only six recipients of this award.
    Two other 2007 recipients of the “Honorary Member” award are Paul Cornell and Steve Resler for their scuba support of Bateaux Below’s underwater archaeological projects.



For Immediate Release
February 21, 2007
 
"The Lost Radeau" Documentary Selected for Buffalo Niagara Film Festival
 
    The documentary, "The Lost Radeau: North America's Oldest Intact Warship," has been selected to be shown in the Buffalo Niagara Film Festival (March 26-31).  The 57 minute long award winning DVD production is one of only 10 documentaries chosen for competition in this film festival.  "The Lost Radeau" production is the collaborative effort of Pepe Productions, Bateaux Below, Inc, Whitesel Graphics, and Black Laser Learning. 
    "The Lost Radeau" is the story of Lake George's 1758 LAND TORTOISE radeau shipwreck.  The sunken vessel is one of the country's most historic submerged cultural resources.  The 52 ft. long British warship was discovered in 1990 during a Klein side scan sonar survey by the Bateaux Below underwater archaeology team.  From 1991-1993, the French & Indian War shipwreck was the focus of an underwater archaeological study directed by Dr. D.K. Abbass and Joseph W. Zarzynski. Today the radeau shipwreck is part of an underwater State park for visiting scuba divers called "Submerged Heritage Preserves."
    Among the celebrity guests appearing at the Buffalo Niagara Film Festival (www.buffaloniagarafilmfestival.com) are actor and director Robert Culp ("I Spy" TV series) and actor and body builder Lou Ferrigno ("The Hulk" TV series).



For Immediate Release
January 1, 2007


Archaeology Paper on Lake George and the Underwater Blueway Trail to be Delivered at National Conference

    A paper on an emerging statewide shipwreck preserve initiative will be presented on January 12, 2007 at a national conference in Williamsburg, Virginia. Entitled “Painting the Water Blue: The New York State Underwater Blueway Trail,” the paper is written by Joseph W. Zarzynski (Bateaux Below, Inc.), David J. Decker (Lake George Watershed Conference), Peter J. Pepe (Pepe Productions), and Steven C. Resler (New York State Department of State). The paper will be presented at the Society for Historical Archaeology’s annual conference, an academic event to help celebrate the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown colony by the English in 1607. Zarzynski, an underwater archaeologist, will deliver the paper.
    The paper examines a two year recreational and heritage tourism project to create shipwreck preserves and develop interpretive exhibits in six maritime communities around the Empire State. Called the Underwater Blueway Trail, this endeavor promotes recreational tourism for scuba divers and heritage tourism for non-divers while fostering protection of the state’s submerged cultural resources.
    An integral element of the Underwater Blueway Trail is the creative interpretation of shipwrecks through a variety of innovative means including shoreline signage, museum and visitor center exhibits, a web site, interactive computer programs, and informative documentary productions.
    Two of the paper’s authors, Peter J. Pepe and Joseph W. Zarzynski, were part of the production team that in late 2005 released the award winning 57 minute long documentary—“The Lost Radeau: North America’s Oldest Intact Warship.” The documentary is the story of the history, sinking, discovery, and archaeological study of the 1758 LAND TORTOISE radeau shipwreck in Lake George, New York.
    The 32 mile long Lake George has had a State-administered shipwreck preserve since 1993. Thus, the lake’s Submerged Heritage Preserves serve as a possible model for the statewide program. Funding for the initiative comes from the New York State Department of State with funds provided under Title 11 of the Environmental Protection Fund Act. The Village of Lake George serves as the municipal administer of the Underwater Blueway Trail.



For Immediate Release
August 29, 2006
 
Lake George Shipwreck Documentary to Be Shown at Savannah, GA Film Festival
 
    A documentary about a Lake George shipwreck will be shown on September 21, at the Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary Ocean Film Festival in Savannah, Georgia.  “The Lost Radeau: North America’s Oldest Intact Warship” DVD documentary is produced by Queensbury-based Pepe Productions in collaboration with Bateaux Below, Whitesel Graphics, and Black Laser Learning. 
    The 57 min. long documentary is the story of the 1758 LAND TORTOISE radeau, a seven-sided British warship from the French and Indian War that is sunk in 107 ft. of water in Lake George.  The wooden shipwreck was found in 1990 during a Klein side scan sonar survey conducted by a group that later became known as Bateaux Below, Inc.  The radeau, a type of floating gun battery, was later studied by a team of underwater archaeologists and volunteer divers. 
    The 7 day film festival, sponsored by the National Park Service, will feature over 40 films.  “The Lost Radeau” documentary, the winner of three national awards for video and documentary excellence, will be aired at the Savannah History Museum Theater during the film festival’s Maritime Heritage segment entitled “Sunken Secrets.”



For Immediate Release
July 7, 2006

1758 Radeau Shipwreck Featured in New Lake George Visitor Center

    On June 29, 2006, the new $1.3 million Lake George Visitor Center, located at the intersection of Canada Street and Beach Road in Lake George, New York, was officially opened. The 3,500 sq. ft. structure is designed to promote Lake George and Warren County tourist venues. Local and state government officials were present for the dedication ceremonies, which was hosted by Mayor Robert Blais (Village of Lake George).
    All of the Lake George Visitor Center’s numerous exhibits were coordinated by Adirondack Studios. Two of the visitor center exhibits featured Lake George’s 1758 LAND TORTOISE radeau shipwreck, a one-of-a-kind sunken warship of the French and Indian War (1755-1763). One of these two exhibits is a panel display about the New York State Underwater Blueway Trail, a New York State Department of State pilot program to create shipwreck preserves in six Empire State waterways to promote recreational tourism for scuba divers as well as encourage heritage tourism for non-divers. The initiative also encourages historic preservation of the shipwrecks and other submerged cultural resources in the state. The Village of Lake George is the municipality that has been selected to help administer the Underwater Blueway Trail program. The exhibit’s focus was about Lake George’s Submerged Heritage Preserves, a state-administered shipwreck park for scuba divers that opened in 1993. The LAND TORTOISE shipwreck is one of three shipwreck sites in this preserve system.
    The other informational exhibit in the Lake George Visitor Center is a 2 minute long video, an excerpt from the award winning 57 min. long DVD documentary—“The Lost Radeau: North America’s Oldest Intact Warship.” The 2 minute long production was edited to tell tourists about the waterway’s shipwreck preserve called “LAND TORTOISE—A 1758 Floating Gun Battery.” The 52 ft. long British floating gun battery lies in 107 ft. of water and the site became a member of Lake George’s Submerged Heritage Preserves in August 1994.
    Both the 2-dimensional exhibit—“New York State Underwater Blueway Trail”—and the 2 minute long video production called “The Lost Radeau” were created by Bateaux Below, Inc. and Pepe Productions. Shannon-Rose Design and Adirondack Studios, however, did the final layout of the “New York State Underwater Blueway Trail” exhibit.
    Both the 2-dimensional display and the informational video were prepared for the New York State Department of State with funds provided under Title 11 of the Environmental Protection Fund Act.



For Immediate Release
March 16, 2006

"The Lost Radeau" Documentary Wins National Honors

    The DVD documentary "The Lost Radeau: North America's Oldest Intact Warship," released on November 30, 2005, has recently won several honors.
    The 57 minute long documentary, about Lake George's 1758 LAND TORTOISE radeau shipwreck, has received two national film and video awards. The locally produced DVD production was given an Aurora Award, Platinum-Best of Show for the Documentary-Historical/Event category. The Aurora Award, Platinum-Best of Show is the highest Aurora Award. "The Lost Radeau" also won a Telly Silver Award, the Telly competition's highest recognition. Both awards are for excellence in video and film productions and are considered the Emmy or Oscar of their fields.
    Finally, Pepe Productions and Bateaux Below, Inc., the two groups that made "The Lost Radeau" documentary, were recently informed that their documentary has been selected to be shown at the prestigious Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary's Ocean Film Festival in Savannah, Georgia in September 2006. The event is sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce. This year's film festival is special since it is the 25th anniversary of Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary, located 17.5 nautical miles off Sapelo Island, Georgia. "The Lost Radeau" was selected in the category of "maritime history" and was especially praised for its technical animations.

info@thelostradeau.com

2005 PEPE PRODUCTIONS / BATEAUX BELOW, INC. / WHITESEL GRAPHICS